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Super Tuesday draws crowd to polls; Wheel Tax referendum fails in Moore County

Posted on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 4:27 pm

Metro Moore County election worker Norma Stone (seated) helps voters in line at the Metro Moore County Courthouse, as Jaime Eslick signs in and prepares to vote on Tuesday morning. (MCN Photo by Robert Holman)

Metro Moore County election worker Norma Stone (seated) helps voters in line at the Metro Moore County Courthouse, as Jaime Eslick signs in and prepares to vote on Tuesday morning. (MCN Photo by Robert Holman)

LYNCHBURG, Tenn. — The Metro Moore County Courthouse was bustling early Tuesday morning as voters turned out for Super Tuesday, the day of the Presidential Primary Election in the state.

Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Texas, Vermont and Virginia held contests for both Republicans and Democrats, while Republicans in Alaska and Democrats in Colorado held their caucuses as well.

Also on Tuesday’s ballot in Lynchburg was the local Wheel Tax referendum, an item that likely has drawn as much interest here as the presidential race itself.

The Wheel Tax referendum — what could have been a key step in getting the Moore County High School renovations off the ground — was defeated, however, by a vote of 1,251 to 480. Of those votes, 1,222 were cast on Tuesday. The other 509 were done during early voting or cast via absentee ballot.

Tuesday’s result is a difficult defeat for proponents of the proposed renovations at the Moore County High School and Middle School campus.

The Metro Lynchburg Moore County Council said monies raised via a wheel tax would be used to help offset a portion of a possible property tax increase.

A referendum on a property tax increase is expected to be on the ballot during the August Primary.

Polls closed at 7 p.m. locally, while some polls in other Super Tuesday states remained open until 8 p.m.

Of the 4,647 registered voters in Moore County, 1,800 (38.7 percent) made their way to the polls, with 1,448 choosing to cast a vote in the Republican Presidential Preference Primary. With 687 tallies, Donald Trump earned 46.9 percent of the vote; Ted Cruz was a distant second here with 403 votes (27 percent).

On the Democrat side, frontrunner Hillary Clinton earned 64.9 percent of the votes (209 total) to best Bernie Sanders, who had 28.9 percent of the vote (93).

The wins by Trump and Clinton here, mirrored much of the nation on Super Tuesday, and though there are still 35 states remaining to go to the polls, both Trump and Clinton have started to shift much of their focus on each other as they prepare for their likely battle for the presidency.

On Saturday, March 5, Democrats and Republicans vote in the Kansas caucuses and Louisiana primaries. Republicans will also vote in Kentucky and Maine, while Democrats will vote in Nebraska. On Sunday, Democrats go to the polls in Maine.

Early voting in-person in Tennessee for the August Primary begins July 15.

Here are some other important dates of note from the state’s 2016 election calendar.

—March 24-If there has not been a county primary called, deadline for county road superintendent candidates to file an affidavit of qualification with the Tennessee Highway Officials Certification Board for August election.

—May 6-First day to receive requests for by-mail ballots from persons other than military and overseas voters for the August election.

—June 20-Deadline to mail ballots to military and overseas voters who have filed an application for ballot by this date for the August election.

—July 5-Voter registration deadline for August.

—July 15-First day to vote early in person for August election.

—July 30-Last day to vote early in person for August election.

—August 4-State Primary and County General Election Day

—August 10-First day to receive requests for by-mail ballots from persons other than military and overseas voters for November election.

—October 11-Voter registration deadline for November elections.

—October 19-First day vote early in person for November election.

—November 1-Deadline for receiving an application for a by-mail ballot for November election.

—November 3-Last day to vote early in person for 2016 November elections.

—November 8-State and Federal General Election

The complete calendar is available online at <http://sos.tn.gov/products/elections/election-calendar-2016>.

—ROBERT HOLMAN, Publisher (mcnpub@lcs.net)

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