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Sheriff’s department hosting Drug Take-Back Initiative April 30

Posted on Saturday, April 23, 2016 at 10:00 am

The Metro Moore County Sheriff’s Department will host a Drug Take-Back day on April 30 as part the 11th National Take-Bake Initiative. (MCN File Photo)

The Metro Moore County Sheriff’s Department will host a Drug Take-Back day on April 30 as part the 11th National Take-Bake Initiative. (MCN File Photo)

LYNCHBURG, Tenn. — The Metro Lynchburg Moore County Sheriff’s Department has a Drug Take-Back day scheduled for Saturday, April 30. The event is in conjunction with the 11th National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day.

According to Moore County Sheriff’s Department Investigator Mike Rainey, the department will be available to take and dispose of old, unused and out-of-date prescription drugs from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. No sharp objects will be accepted.

This was will be the 11th National Take-Bake Initiative events since September 2010. Cumulatively across the nation these events have collected 5,525,021 pounds of drugs.

According to the United States Drug Enforcement Administration, thousands of Americans in communities across the country discarded more than 350 tons of unused, expired, or unwanted drugs as part of the DEA’s 10th National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Initiative on Sept. 26, 2015.

More than 3,800 federal, state and local counterparts took in more than 702,365 pounds of unused, expired or unwanted drugs at more than 5,000 collection sites across the United States.

National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day aims to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse of medications.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs.

Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines — flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash — both pose potential safety and health hazards.

“The numbers are shocking — approximately 46,000 Americans die each year from drug-related deaths.  More than half of those are from heroin and prescription opioids,” said acting DEA Administrator Chuck Rosenberg. “With four out of five new heroin users starting with prescription medications, I know our take-back program makes a real difference.”

The NTBI addresses a crucial public safety and public health issue. According to the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 6.5 million Americans abused controlled prescription drugs. That same study showed that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet.

The DEA’s NTBI events are also a significant piece of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy’s prescription drug abuse prevention strategy.

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